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Haydari with Carrots (Havuçlu Haydari)

I’m glad that my wife loves talking with people.  Everywhere we go either she or I is asking a waitress or a cook how they prepared something.  In most cases the cook or chef is happy to oblige.  This dish is a result of my wife’s insatiable curiosity regarding new recipes and her ability to charm the socks of of anyone… Even if that someone happens to be a chef in Izmir, Turkey. That doesn’t speak English. But still has no problem teaching another cook how to make his version of Haydari with Carrots (Havuçlu Haydari).

Haydari is a fairly common dish in Turkish Meze.  Generally it’s a mix of yogurt, garlic, mint and olive oil.  I’ve seen some recipes that call for sumac as well.  This one is a slightly less spicy version that uses carrots (Havuçlu) and omits the garlic and dill usually found in the dish.

How to make Haydari with Carrots (Havuçlu Haydari)

Just 5 ingredients and about 10 minutes of prep will get you something spectacular, especially if you’ve gone ahead and made a batch of flatbreads to slather this wonderful dip on.  of course, you can always just eat it with a spoon, too.  (I may have eaten most of it that way…  It’s possible.)

This is a dish that you just have to try!  it rivals turkish style yogurt hummus for yum-factor and is just as simple to make, but has a much lighter and fresher flavor.  If you’re looking for the perfect way to get a few carrots on the table.  This is it.

Haydari with Carrots (Havuçlu Haydari)
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 3 Large carrots, grated
  • 3 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1-1/2 cups Greek style yogurt
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Method
  1. Heat olive oil, salt and pepper together in a heavy bottomed skillet over medium high heat until the oil smells peppery. Add grated carrots and cook, stirring constantly, for 3 minutes. Remove from heat and mix with yogurt. Mix in a pinch of salt if desired.
  2. Chill well before serving.
  3. Share and Enjoy!

What I would have done differently had I thought of it at the time:

This dish is often made with garlic and dried mint as well, but the version that my wife had in Izmir Turkey did not include these ingredients.  This may be a regional thing, or it may have been the preference of the restaurant owner.  We’re not sure.

If you have any knowledge of the regional aspects of this dish, please let us know in the comments!

Links to other recipes like this:

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